investment planning

New Back Office System and a Good Finish to a Tough Year

Anyone reading my newsletters throughout 2022 is well aware that this has been a tough year. We've dealt with significant Inflation, higher Interest Rates and a weak Stock Market. In past years, when the Stock Market struggles, you might get some help from your Bond Funds. Not in a year like this. In 2022, with Interest Rates quickly rising, it has put some serious downward pressure on the Bond Market. Very few things have worked well this year and this rare phenomenon of Stocks and Bonds being so heavily correlated is very rare.

A Tough First Half to 2022

It's been frustrating to have to report bad news in a number of newsletters this year but anyone who knows me knows that I won't try to gloss over things. 2022 has been a tough year with War in Europe, Rising Prices across the Globe, Labour Shortages, Supply Chain Issues, and now, Higher Interest Rates. It has been a very hard year to navigate through. In fact, it has been the worst first six months to a year on the Stock Market since 19621.

Portfolio Diversification

Looking back over the past few years, one thing is certain - we can never be absolutely sure what the financial markets will do at any given time. We can study charts and graphs, both historical and forecasted, we can consult with economic experts, business leaders, and government officials, we can look at inflation and interest rates, and still we cannot predict the markets with absolute certainty.

When Interest Rates Rise

One way to curb rising inflation is to increase interest rates, and that is what the Bank of Canada (BoC) is expected to do incrementally - over the next year. As interest rates begin to tick upward, it is an ideal time to look at your financial position, including your debt and savings strategies.

Being Thrifty Can Be Fun

A year ago, Faye and David decided to get smart around saving money. "We both love the idea of retirement," says Faye. "But we could never seem to close the gap between what we earn and what it costs to run our life to increase our savings." As the couple approached their fifties, they decided to find innovative ways to save. "One of the ways we could do that was to spend less on the things we needed," says David. "We love a challenge, so we decided that we wouldn't make any major purchases for a year without comparison shopping or a money-saving coupon."

The 50-30-20 Rule

"At this point last January, I was determined to change my relationship with money forever," says Daniel. This is a New Year's resolution he shared with 69% of Canadians last year1. However, unlike most others, Daniel has been able to stick with his promise to get control of his financial life. "I'd say 100% of my success comes down to working with a financial advisor who offered me a powerful way to get started and keep going."

Financial Advice for New and Expecting Parents

Whether you're expecting a child, planning to have one soon or have just become a new parent, you're about to embark on one of the most rewarding journeys that life has to offer. It's also one of the most expensive: an average of $12,500 per year until age 18.1. That's $225,000 per child, and it doesn't include the cost of post-secondary education. Planning for this is one way to be the best parent you can be.

What's Your Investing Personality?

Just as each of us is unique as a person, we also have a distinct investing personality. One isn't better or worse than the other, but understanding "who” you are as an investor is helpful, no matter your circumstances, or how much money you have to invest. While it's a complex matter that depends on various factors, exploring the questions below may give you some preliminary insight into your investing personality.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - investment planning